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boss, admiral tom moore. because tom moore would soon come to resent the closeness that bud zumwalt had with paul. because oftentimes with respect to vietnam policy, bud was following out about policy before admiral moore would know antibiotic. and this eventually -- about it. and this eventually led moore to come up with this plan. no one had ever heard of any admiral who went off to vietnam at that time. it was sort of like the death knell for admirals. and the navy itself was in the bath water at that time except, of course, for the aviators. i mean, the glory was in the air war. but nothing was going on with respect to the brown water navy, and bud zumwalt would change all that. and, of course, eventually he would go from there to cno, and i have four chapters on the cno years. then i have this chapter that i had the most fun writing about, the comments about the zumwalt intelligence service which i learned a lot about how bud actually had his own spies placed in henry kissinger's shop. it was a sr. systematic -- it was a very systematic organization because he along with tom moore
, prejudice or what, but a major battle at moore's creek, north carolina, not far from wilmington, north carolina. a british fleet was going to land soldiers at wilmington, and an army formed inland, marching towards the coast to join up with the british regulars. a force that were rebels, but what we call patriots, intercepted them and massacred them at moore's creek, which is -- a blind gull issue where rebels were wait r for them to wipe them out. without the loyalists support, the british troops couldn't land keeping the south free of british control for a few years until they landed at charleston. yes, sir? >> you mentioned that the boston tea party spread south to new york and to other cities. almost sounds as though were the network of people who were having the same thought or inspired one way or the another or working together. i never thought of the boston tea party as being that, but is that really -- >> yes. sam adams set up because there was no other form of communication, set up a series of committees of correspondence in every major city in the country. they started commun
moore. lori moore is the author of three story collections and three novels. the most recent being a aid of the stairs, finalist for the pen faulkner award and the orange prize. for fiction and nonfiction have appeared in "the new yorker," the new york review books, "the new york times," the paris review, the yale review and elsewhere. she's been the recipient that the irish times prize for international fiction, the rea award for a short story, the pen malamud award, the o'henry award and the land and fellowship. she is a member of the american academy of arts and letters and it gives me great pressure to introduce lori moore. [applause] ♪ >> the other members of this year's jury for the national book award in fiction are stacy dur as moe, didn't i'll and janet perry. [applause] why would these otherwise sane, reasonable and brilliant people consent to this juror cracks one where you make a thousand enemies and maybe only one friend? while your front porch fills up of packages and your neighbors think you have a terrible late-night on line shopping habit through the entire spring and
that year it on the far left as a poet, mary ann moore who won for poetry in the middle is james jones, who won from here to eternity. i wrote in the book -- in my book that shows did not particularly happy back pain. it looks relatively content, but it must've been a difficult night because everybody knew he was a compromise winner. it was anybody's first choice. two other novels that cancel each other out. one was mccain mutiny and the other boat that naturalized was this odd comic novel about a teenager called the catcher in the rye. so when does to knock heads, jones was the default winner. at any rate, and love this picture because it's hard to imagine a more unlikely gathering. mary ann moore, the scare your comment is high-profile poet, who always for the stray corner cat. the younger novelists and rachel carson, zoologists turned nature writer. while this is obvious to an early highpoint because she finally achieved her goal of becoming a writer. it's natural to think that she moved from here to more than a decade later writing about pesticide in silent spring. but in fact, she was
moore of "the wall street journal," the top 10% of income earners in this country pay more income tax proportionally than the top 10% than any other industrialized country. there's not a shortage of tax pain. the key thing is how do you get a system that encourages more creativity to the government and the collecting more. surveys have shown, research has shown countries have low tax rates systems, low tax burden, end up collecting more revenue than those that have high tax rates or raising their tax burden. again, people have more free markets and the government will get its abundant cut as well. the key thing is how do you get the free markets going quite heavy get our freedom and free markets? how do you get them going? it would be fine sponsor remembers what it's world is, not the cover or have today, but by madison and others. >> we've been talking with steve forbes about his new book, "freedom manifesto: why free markets are moral and big government isn't" also out on the market is "how capitalism will save us." what's your enthusiasm level but then that romney campaign? >> he w
winners that year. on the far left is mary ann moore to run for poetry and in the east james jones for one from here to eternity. i wrote in the book that jones did not particularly happy. they must've been a difficult night for him because everybody knew he was a compromise winner. he was not anybody's first choice. two other novels that cancel each other out. one was mccain mutiny and the other the industrialized was this odd little comic novel about a teenager called the catcher in the rye. so when those two not ted, jones was the default winner. at any rate, i love this picture because it's hard to imagine a more unlikely gathering. mary ann morris is skewed here, this high-profile poet who always for the the strike cornered hat. the young were not the list and then rachel carson, zoologist turned nature writer.bhih this is obviously an early high point for carson because she finally achieved her goal of becoming a writer. it's natural to think that she moved from here to mark and a decade later writing about pesticides in "silent spring," but she was already concerned about pestic
years after the rebellion, a young woman named hannah moore went from the united states to work in thing my in sierra leone, and at a holiday dinner where there were still, i think, maybe four or five of the amistad veterans living at the mission, she asked them to tell their story of the uprising. and then she wrote it all down. so, she transcribed their oral history of the rebellion, how they had committed it to their own memory. this is a stunning source, and it contains information that no other source of the time period had. for example, about what was the debate down in the hold of the amistad when they're trying to decide whether to rise up and seize the ship or not? the oral history contained information about that discussion. that's really getting close to the source. and there you actually hear the voices of the people who made the history. so, my point is, there is a huge amount of evidence for history from below. so much so that it's possible, actually, to get to know these people as individuals. you can hear them speaking. you can get a sense of their sense of humor. it's a
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7